Top East Coast Education Schools

Over the last few years, the education scenario has changed significantly. It won’t be wrong to say that it has become different from what it used to be 20 years back. Education has turned into a vast field, which generally encompasses a wide range of subjects. These days, teachers and tutors working in schools or universities are held in high esteem. Today teaching is considered as one of the most respectful occupations. In fact, talking in terms of present context there is no better investment you can make than making a career in education. In recent times, the demand for qualified educators has been rise and this trend is more likely to increase in the near future. It doesn’t mater, whether you are more inclined in working as an elementary school teacher, special education instructor, professor, lecturer or corporate trainer, in education industry you can find a career that can be extremely rewarding.Today if we look at the current scenario then we can easily find that there has been a considerable increase in the number of educational institutions in the United States, but in recent years the East Coast of the United States has turned out to be the major hub of education schools that has pulled many students from all across the nation. While the physical East Coast of the United States ranges from Maine down to Florida, but the term ‘East Coast’ primarily refers to the Northeastern and mid Atlantic states. In fact, nowadays this East Coast region of the United States is considered as an abode to many top-ranked and admired education colleges and universities. Most of the schools are known for academics and are widely recognized names among U.S. top education schools. So in case you are looking forward to earning an education degree in any of the specialized field then here are few schools or universities that you can apply for:Keller Graduate School of Management, New York: This school is known for offering exceptional learning environment and offer degree programs in Educational Management. It even delivers the credibility you expect and the flexibility you basically required to gain your professional edge.Five Towns College, New York: Situated at the geographic center of Long Island, Five Towns College is majorly known preparing students for work in the education industry for many years. Dedicated to excellence in learning, teaching, and scholarship, the college offers the music education program. It offers the Bachelor of Music (MusB) in music education (K-12).McCann School of Business & Technology, Pennsylvania: Committed to excel in the post-secondary education, this school offer diploma program in early childhood education. Besides this, the school has a rich record for helping its students succeed and features one of the best administration dedicated to the highest standards of instruction.Montreat College School, North Carolina: Founded in the year 1916, this college offers programs at the associate’s and master’s degree levels in general education and elementary education respectively.Strayer University, Virginia: Located at different campus in Virginia, this university offers quality education programs in Educational Management and Technology in Education that is affordable, supportive and convenient.Today certainly education is one of the booming industries and growing with additional jobs each day. The profession has its many rewards, but in order to gain the benefits it is very important to earn a degree from a good school or university. These names mentioned above are some of the oldest and best know institutions of earning degree in education learning in East Coast region of the United States.

Noisy Libraries Embrace Blabbermouth Bias In Modern Education – More Evidence

The ProblemThree earlier EzineArticles introduce and discuss my analysis of the noise problem in modern libraries:
(August 4, 2011) Library Standards Have Crumbled-Time To Reclaim Quiet introduces the problem and makes the call for a return to traditional quiet as the proper foundation of courtesy and concentration in true learning.
(August 9, 2011) Library Noise Now The Golden Standard – New Values Corrupt Silence pins the blame for the problem of noisy libraries largely on the dominant cultural values of Western society that reject silence.
(August 17, 2011) Modern Education Experts Profess Value Of Silence – Why Librarians Ignore locates the source of the noisy library problem in current pedagogies (i.e., teaching philosophies) that privilege speech, as documented by five, peer-reviewed expert sources in the field of education.
The present EzineArticle lists four additional, peer-reviewed, expert sources that further document troubling cultural forces in today’s educational system that are degrading the quality of these once-quiet public spaces.The following paragraphs list citations of my latest sources, along with my interpretations of each source’s main points:Huey-li Li (2001). Silences And Silencing Silences. THE PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION SOCIETY YEARBOOK 2001:157-165.
Educational discussions about silence seem to be erroneous and one-dimensional, treating the absence of talk as the consequence of a disciplinary act only.
In modern discussions about multi-cultural education, educators should re-think the simple dichotomy of silence versus speech and challenge the primacy of speech.
Technological advancements in modern industrial society are especially powerful lures that cause people of developed nations to avoid silence and to justify intolerance of silence.
Mass media and computer-mediated communication systems constantly erode and destroy silent spaces at the public level, thus making it nearly impossible for individuals to learn how to appreciate silence, either by themselves or in the presence of others.
Americans are a nation of “space pluggers” and “gap fillers”, both in education and in life, as we obsessively fill what we think are empty spaces and empty sound gaps with the perpetual flux of objects and decibels.
The idea of “cooperative learning” has become the dominant idea in mainstream teacher education.
When teachers, in classroom settings, use the idea of “participation” as a measure of student participation, they inevitably condition students in the belief that silent, active listening is not a legitimate form of “participating.”
Speech can be systematically distorted, consciously or unconsciously, to give some groups or individuals more importance than others.
“… the dichotomization of silence and speech misleads us to devalue silence and privilege speech…. I call for recognition of the need to dismantle this false dichotomy and to develop a pedagogical understanding of silences.” (p. 162)
Megan Boler (2001). The Challenge Of Interpreting Silence In Public Spaces. THE PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION SOCIETY YEARBOOK 2001:166-169.
Emphasizing speaking is a method of enforcing the “silencing of silence”, which perpetuates the false idea that talking automatically represents democratic participation.
Favoring speech ignores reflective practice.
Systematic education in the art of listening does not exist in elementary schools, in secondary schools, in higher learning, or in the public sphere.
Silence has deeply personal and spiritual aspects, regarded as evils in education and politics.
Educators need to be extremely cautious about emphasizing speech and de-emphasizing quiet.
By cultivating the practice of quiet mindfulness, teachers can greatly enhance the quality of interaction and the quality of thought that takes place in education.
In political and educational contexts, silence is automatically feared, “pathologized”, and assigned no currency, yet, ironically, we must speak of this problem in order to avoid it.
Cathleen Haskins (2010). Integrating Silence Practices Into The Classroom: The Value of Quiet. ENCOUNTER: EDUCATION FOR MEANING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE 23 (3):1-6.
The current disregard for silence in modern educational philosophy begins to take hold early in a child’s life, where the once slow, easy freedoms of childhood barely exist today.
In modern civilization, we live in a storm of noise that robs children of their abilities to know the beauty of silence.
Most children in today’s developed world know silence only as discipline or as punishment from controlling adults, and these children are further denied positive, quiet experiences by adults who have lost their own ways in a noisy world.
Today’s adolescents grow up with technological innovations that disable their desires to know fulfilling quiet and creative solitude.
Nonstop, incessant noise has become the norm that disconnects people of all ages from their inner resources.
Holistic education reform requires that teachers create learning environments that offer exercises in stillness and silence, where silence is NOT treated as the negative force of adult authority, but as the positive space of inner peace, creativity, and renewal.
Kathryn Byrnes (2011). Review of RETHINKING CLASSROOM PARTICIPATION: LISTENING TO SILENT VOICES By Katherine Schultz.. EDUCATION REVIEW, 14.
Relying on verbal participation to assess learning often rewards compliance (i.e. talking that the teacher expects) instead of thoughtfulness and comprehension.
Speech becomes more powerful and insightful through a norm of silence.
American schools traditionally do not value silence.
Talk does not necessarily equal learning.
Schools and communities need to return to a wise understanding of silence, inspired by the saying, “You have two ears and one mouth for a reason. You should listen twice as much as you speak.” (p. 4)
RECAPI attribute the relatively recent problem of excessive noise in libraries to four main causes:
Modern, Western civilization has always treated speech in primarily positive terms, while treating silence in primarily negative terms of authoritative control and punishment.
Runaway developments in technology (e.g., computers and mobile communication devices) have enacted and enforced Western cultural values that privilege speech in epic proportions.
Parallel developments in education have mirrored popular culture’s information-exchange mania, thus solidifying Western values that favor speech and fear silence.
Seller/consumer relationships have surpassed student/teacher relationships in importance, as institutions struggle to survive in an economy that supports primarily goods and services “aimed to please.”
© 2011 Robert G. Kernodle